INTERVIEW WITH PRINT STUDIOS

In the current dense landscape of studios creating casino software, there’s a lot of repeated content heavily inspired by high-performing favorites. Few producers dare to come forward with innovative ideas for themes and features. However, some are keen on breaking comfortable norms and delivering unique, memorable experiences. One such provider is Print Studios, a young company launched in 2020 by three ambitious minds.

Today, we get to speak to one of them, Carl Wiggman, the CEO. Before he co-founded the studio, he gained plenty of experience at Kindred Group, being responsible for the production of exclusive slots. After that, he joined Push Gaming as a product owner, leading the creation of numerous exciting games. We’ll discuss the beginnings of Print Studios, the ideas behind the mechanics and the games, as well as the upcoming explosive release. Let’s begin.

Carl Wiggman Interview

INTERVIEW WITH PRINT STUDIOS

Carl Wiggman Interview

In the current dense landscape of studios creating casino software, there’s a lot of repeated content heavily inspired by high-performing favorites. Few producers dare to come forward with innovative ideas for themes and features. However, some are keen on breaking comfortable norms and delivering unique, memorable experiences. One such provider is Print Studios, a young company launched in 2020 by three ambitious minds.

Today, we get to speak to one of them, Carl Wiggman, the CEO. Before he co-founded the studio, he gained plenty of experience at Kindred Group, being responsible for the production of exclusive slots. After that, he joined Push Gaming as a product owner, leading the creation of numerous exciting games. We’ll discuss the beginnings of Print Studios, the ideas behind the mechanics and the games, as well as the upcoming explosive release. Let’s begin.

Hi Carl, and thank you for taking the time to talk with us. Before we dive into the fantastic games and mechanics, could you tell us a few words about the studio? When was the idea born? What was the main motivation behind it? And what does the “Print” signify in the name?

Martin, GAMBLINGTON

The idea came from us founders seeing a waste of potential in the industry where talented creators and developers would be forced into managerial roles. We wanted to turn this around and allow people that just love to make games to continue to do so without feeling like they’re getting the short end of the stick. We struggled for a long while to come up with a good name, in our initial pitches we called ourselves “Flaming Spear” (yeah…). Print felt like a great name as it had a positive spin and let people in on the fact that we’re huge enthusiasts ourselves.

Carl, PRINT STUDIOS

Creating a slot game requires the involvement of multiple specialists – mathematicians, art and sound designers, engine developers, front-end developers, and as far as we know, none of the founding trio had that kind of experience. Was it difficult to find the right talent, and did you have everyone on board from the start?

Martin, GAMBLINGTON

Indeed, break out Art into illustrator and animator, and you pretty much got all the ingredients aside from the producer (me), and yes, it was difficult! Finding people with experience of any kind can be hard, but if you also need people that can execute on our kind of games, that makes it even harder. Two major reasons star talents still decided to join was that everyone got share options in the company and the joy of taking on a new challenge.

Carl, PRINT STUDIOS

We’ve been following Print Studios from the very first days, and with every new title, we’re more impressed with your games. However, you started off with a Book of Destiny slot. Some would say it was not the most creative approach, given the number of similar releases already live at the time. What fueled such a decision?

Martin, GAMBLINGTON

Thank you, such a question shows you really know our journey in-depth, which is appreciated! Indeed Book of Destiny is not really our signum, and we knew it wouldn’t be from the get-go, but it was a good starting game for us for a number of reasons. In order to get some early cash flow we needed to make it an exclusive title (where LeoVegas was a great partner), and the idea was simpler to sell in a presentation than a complex brand-new feature. We also felt the book genre had some major Quality of Life improvements (such as the gamble and the symbol choice feature) that we wanted to put out there.

Carl, PRINT STUDIOS

Your second release, Crystal Golem, came with the Super Spinners feature, a brilliant way of boosting regular wins through multipliers on individual pay lines. When most of the industry was trying to elevate the experience with more winning ways, you stayed true to a traditional 5×3 format. Were you confident it was the right choice?

Martin, GAMBLINGTON

Thanks, I always loved the chunky pay lines you can get in 10/20-line games, but these days we need generally want variation and potential than that can bring. For that reason, I liked SuperSpinners early on, but I didn’t make it with the idea that it would feature in so many of our games. It’s just hard to avoid it when you compare prototypes with and without SuperSpinners, usually the one with is more fun.

Carl, PRINT STUDIOS

Is there an interest in using Super Spinners by other studios? If so, are you open to licensing the mechanism, or you prefer to keep it exclusive to Print Studios?

Martin, GAMBLINGTON

There have been some interests, but mostly over beers. In case someone felt they had an amazing idea that needed SuperSpinners to come alive it’d be interesting to have the conversation, we don’t want to hoard for the sake of hoarding, but our main focus is just to use it to make as good games as possible.

Carl, PRINT STUDIOS

Your latest game, Pine of Plinko, was a debut on Relax Gaming’s Dream Drop network. Do you see a spike in activity because of that, and has it positively affected other games in your portfolio?

Martin, GAMBLINGTON

It’s always hard to say what caused what when there are so many parameters involved. Plinko was indeed a great release for us, with lots of activity despite the fewer operators due to the Dream Drop rules, but there was a lot of hype for the game beforehand too.

Carl, PRINT STUDIOS

Do you plan to incorporate other exciting games of chance, like Plinko, as bonuses or features in your future slots?

Martin, GAMBLINGTON

There are actually not a whole lot of non-slot game mechanics that can stand up to reels and lines when it comes to variation and potential, but I think Plinko is one of them. So that could well happen (hehe) but something like Crash, I feel, works best as a side-game, like we did to an extent in Huntress. Still, we love tinkering with new mechanics, so you can trust some new stuff will be coming in the future.

Carl, PRINT STUDIOS

On to your upcoming game Holy Hand Grenade. The title sounds intriguing, and the art undoubtedly refers to the creations of the Monty Python comedy troupe. Whose idea was it, and did the whole Print team back it right away?

Martin, GAMBLINGTON

Yeah, we all felt right away that Holy Hand Grenade sounds like a super fun slot to play. It’s got the right level of explosions and cheek built right into the name. Then we spun up a story from that together. I had the original idea with the little town and the maniacal clergyman, and our artist brought the goats!

Carl, PRINT STUDIOS

With a slightly larger grid in the base game and an even larger one in the bonus, Super Spinners had to evolve. Are you planning to develop the mechanism further and put it on more extensive reel areas?

Martin, GAMBLINGTON

Definitely have ideas to develop the mechanism further, and we’re also polishing the foundational workings each time (for example, in HHG, there’s a new win animation that will avoid going through all the win lines every time you hit a big cluster), but might not necessarily be bigger and bigger grids. One of the main attractions is that you can pack unprecedented potential into a single line, so bigger grids are only needed for cases like this (where it allows more grenade chain reactions).

Carl, PRINT STUDIOS

Was the spreading Mystery Symbol the first choice for the main feature in Holy Hand Grenade? We feel like it’s a perfect choice, especially when the explosion reaches cells with high-value Super Spinners, but was that the plan from the start?

Martin, GAMBLINGTON

Yeah, spot on. In the first storyboard, the Mystery part worked slightly differently, where instead of the grenade spreading tile-by-tile, it would cycle between three differently sized patterns and choose one. I think this works better, hope your readers like it too!

Carl, PRINT STUDIOS

Congratulations on all your games so far. We feel like Print Studios is one of the most promising slot creators in the industry. The diversity and originality of your products is just outstanding. We were especially blown away by Reapers, which we consider a true masterpiece of online gambling, and so far, it’s the only review on our site that received a perfect 10/10 rating. We can’t wait for the upcoming Holy Hand Grenade and other brilliant surprises you have in store for the players. Thank you for your time.

Martin, GAMBLINGTON

Thank you so much, it really means a lot. Reading that review on Reapers was a huge joy for the whole team, especially as the itself review was so rich and in-depth. We really look forward to hearing your take on our upcoming roadmap, and I love reading your reviews on the competition as well, you can tell there’s passion in the articles! Thanks yourself, this was fun.

Carl, PRINT STUDIOS

CHECK OUT MORE GAMES FROM PRINT STUDIOS

Hi Carl, and thank you for taking the time to talk with us. Before we dive into the fantastic games and mechanics, could you tell us a few words about the studio? When was the idea born? What was the main motivation behind it? And what does the “Print” signify in the name?

Creating a slot game requires the involvement of multiple specialists – mathematicians, art and sound designers, engine developers, front-end developers, and as far as we know, none of the founding trio had that kind of experience. Was it difficult to find the right talent, and did you have everyone on board from the start?

The idea came from us founders seeing a waste of potential in the industry where talented creators and developers would be forced into managerial roles. We wanted to turn this around and allow people that just love to make games to continue to do so without feeling like they’re getting the short end of the stick. We struggled for a long while to come up with a good name, in our initial pitches we called ourselves “Flaming Spear” (yeah…). Print felt like a great name as it had a positive spin and let people in on the fact that we’re huge enthusiasts ourselves.

Indeed, break out Art into illustrator and animator, and you pretty much got all the ingredients aside from the producer (me), and yes, it was difficult! Finding people with experience of any kind can be hard, but if you also need people that can execute on our kind of games, that makes it even harder. Two major reasons star talents still decided to join was that everyone got share options in the company and the joy of taking on a new challenge.

We’ve been following Print Studios from the very first days, and with every new title, we’re more impressed with your games. However, you started off with a Book of Destiny slot. Some would say it was not the most creative approach, given the number of similar releases already live at the time. What fueled such a decision?

Thank you, such a question shows you really know our journey in-depth, which is appreciated! Indeed Book of Destiny is not really our signum, and we knew it wouldn’t be from the get-go, but it was a good starting game for us for a number of reasons. In order to get some early cash flow we needed to make it an exclusive title (where LeoVegas was a great partner), and the idea was simpler to sell in a presentation than a complex brand-new feature. We also felt the book genre had some major Quality of Life improvements (such as the gamble and the symbol choice feature) that we wanted to put out there.

Your second release, Crystal Golem, came with the Super Spinners feature, a brilliant way of boosting regular wins through multipliers on individual pay lines. When most of the industry was trying to elevate the experience with more winning ways, you stayed true to a traditional 5×3 format. Were you confident it was the right choice?

Thanks, I always loved the chunky pay lines you can get in 10/20-line games, but these days we need generally want variation and potential than that can bring. For that reason, I liked SuperSpinners early on, but I didn’t make it with the idea that it would feature in so many of our games. It’s just hard to avoid it when you compare prototypes with and without SuperSpinners, usually the one with is more fun.

Is there an interest in using Super Spinners by other studios? If so, are you open to licensing the mechanism, or you prefer to keep it exclusive to Print Studios?

There have been some interests, but mostly over beers. In case someone felt they had an amazing idea that needed SuperSpinners to come alive it’d be interesting to have the conversation, we don’t want to hoard for the sake of hoarding, but our main focus is just to use it to make as good games as possible.

Your latest game, Pine of Plinko, was a debut on Relax Gaming’s Dream Drop network. Do you see a spike in activity because of that, and has it positively affected other games in your portfolio?

It’s always hard to say what caused what when there are so many parameters involved. Plinko was indeed a great release for us, with lots of activity despite the fewer operators due to the Dream Drop rules, but there was a lot of hype for the game beforehand too.

Do you plan to incorporate other exciting games of chance, like Plinko, as bonuses or features in your future slots?

There are actually not a whole lot of non-slot game mechanics that can stand up to reels and lines when it comes to variation and potential, but I think Plinko is one of them. So that could well happen (hehe) but something like Crash, I feel, works best as a side-game, like we did to an extent in Huntress. Still, we love tinkering with new mechanics, so you can trust some new stuff will be coming in the future.

On to your upcoming game Holy Hand Grenade. The title sounds intriguing, and the art undoubtedly refers to the creations of the Monty Python comedy troupe. Whose idea was it, and did the whole Print team back it right away?

Yeah, we all felt right away that Holy Hand Grenade sounds like a super fun slot to play. It’s got the right level of explosions and cheek built right into the name. Then we spun up a story from that together. I had the original idea with the little town and the maniacal clergyman, and our artist brought the goats!

With a slightly larger grid in the base game and an even larger one in the bonus, Super Spinners had to evolve. Are you planning to develop the mechanism further and put it on more extensive reel areas?

Definitely have ideas to develop the mechanism further, and we’re also polishing the foundational workings each time (for example, in HHG, there’s a new win animation that will avoid going through all the win lines every time you hit a big cluster), but might not necessarily be bigger and bigger grids. One of the main attractions is that you can pack unprecedented potential into a single line, so bigger grids are only needed for cases like this (where it allows more grenade chain reactions).

Was the spreading Mystery Symbol the first choice for the main feature in Holy Hand Grenade? We feel like it’s a perfect choice, especially when the explosion reaches cells with high-value Super Spinners, but was that the plan from the start?

Yeah, spot on. In the first storyboard, the Mystery part worked slightly differently, where instead of the grenade spreading tile-by-tile, it would cycle between three differently sized patterns and choose one. I think this works better, hope your readers like it too!

Congratulations on all your games so far. We feel like Print Studios is one of the most promising slot creators in the industry. The diversity and originality of your products is just outstanding. We were especially blown away by Reapers, which we consider a true masterpiece of online gambling, and so far, it’s the only review on our site that received a perfect 10/10 rating. We can’t wait for the upcoming Holy Hand Grenade and other brilliant surprises you have in store for the players. Thank you for your time.

Thank you so much, it really means a lot. Reading that review on Reapers was a huge joy for the whole team, especially as the itself review was so rich and in-depth. We really look forward to hearing your take on our upcoming roadmap, and I love reading your reviews on the competition as well, you can tell there’s passion in the articles! Thanks yourself, this was fun.

CHECK OUT MORE GAMES FROM PRINT STUDIOS

2023-03-17T14:35:40+00:00

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